Leadership is about effective communication, leading from the front, and bringing out the best in individuals according to their competencies. One more crucial characteristic that a leader must possess is the art of diplomacy.

The UN Security Council’s resolutions have not succeeded to stop North Korea’s nuclear program. All over the world, refugees have increased, reaching 65 million, of which half are children. The Doha round has stalled, resulting in the proliferation of bilateral and regional Free Trade Agreements, less efficient than a multilateral agreement.

The rapid progress of technology has brought about an era of massive change. Distances have shortened, while IT has made communication easier, quicker and more reliable, providing a different perspective of time and space and driving social and cultural globalization by making the flow of ideas and information ever more accessible.

Welcome to the second issue of the inaugural year of the Journal of Rising Powers. In our first issue, we focused a great diversity of issues and articles around two anchoring pieces that dealt with the South China Sea conflict, which was front and center across most global media outlets at the time.

There will be no bloc of ‘emerging economies’ rising up to challenge the Western order. But what comes next may be more chaotic and dangerous.” ~ Suzanne Nossel, July 6, 2016 Foreign Policy

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ack in 2008 it was easy to see scholars, analysts, and diplomats all clamoring about the coming global transformation, where American hegemony would be on the wane and ultimately overcome by new powers and new power organizations like BRICS and MINT. That prophecy no longer seems destined for realization.

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t is an established article of faith in the discipline of international relations that in formulating their foreign policies, in selecting certain courses of action over others, and especially when it comes to the business of forming allies and selecting trading partners, states do so through a rational analysis of costs and benefits to be obtained from selecting one “partner” over another (Diego, 2010: 265).

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February 2017 – Ever since 1964, when it was informally accepted to the United Nations General Assembly, the Holy See has had a permanent seat at international discussions and used its observer status to go on record about matters of peace and human dignity.

“Nothing brings me more happiness than trying to help the most vulnerable people in society. It is a goal and an essential part of my life – a kind of destiny. Whoever is in distress can call on me. I will come running wherever they are”. - Princess Diana

The article 2 of the Constitution of The International Women's Club of Moscow says, “The purpose of the Club is to promote friendship and to further cultural activities among women of all nationalities residing in Moscow and to raise funds to be donated to charitable activities.”

For two decades ASEM has played a key role as a forum for dialogue and cooperation connecting Asia with Europe. ASEM’s value and continuing importance in today’s politics and inter-regional relations is uncontested. Nevertheless, as an informal forum ASEM is destined to evolve along with a transforming global environment. Since its inception in 1996 the forum has significantly changed. More specifically, it has substantially enlarged, adapting itself to an increasingly multipolar world, a growing European Union and a more interdependent Asian region.

Some days ago, I achieved historical continuity between Hungary and Indonesia — well, at least in connection to my father and me. How so? In the early 1960s, my father was assigned to set up the Indonesian Embassy in Budapest. Indonesia had already established diplomatic relations with Hungary in 1955, but did not actually have a physical embassy.

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